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Visitors pack the first flight from Ft. Lauderdale for JetBlue; bookings solid

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Providenciales, 20 Nov 2015 – A sold out flight, a bodacious cake, water canon send-off from Florida, water canon reception in Provo and hopes of a larger aircraft for the service were signature and surrounding the inaugural flight of JetBlue out of Ft. Lauderdale into Providenciales yesterday. Tourism, hotel and airline officials were on board the plane into Provo, and CEO of the Turks and Caicos Islands Airport Authority, John Smith said already the service is drawing guests to this destination.

John Smith, TCIAA: “Well I can say to you today is that the majority of the individuals on the flight were visitors and I had the opportunity while in Ft Lauderdale before boarding the flight, speaking to several individuals there who were very happy, some of who mused phrases like, it was long overdue and I will not be flying out of Miami anymore. I was driven too by the Hotel Association because a lot of their guests have been asking for this flight.”

In an hour and 20-minutes passengers will arrive into Providenciales, the world’s #1 island on the flight which departs the Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport. Currently JetBlue is using an Embrya 190, which seats 100 passengers.

Magnetic Media is a Telly Award winning multi-media company specializing in creating compelling and socially uplifting TV and Radio broadcast programming as a means for advertising and public relations exposure for its clients.

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Guys, Have 2 Minutes? Here’s How to Check Yourself for Testicular Cancer

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Testicular cancer is a rare form of cancer for men in The Bahamas.  It is highly curable — if you know it’s there!

 

November 30, 2021 – Men…how often do you perform a self-exam to check yourselves for testicular cancer?

While it’s a relatively rare form of cancer, young men aren’t exempt – in fact, testicular cancer occurs most often in young and middle-aged men. The good news is, it can usually be treated successfully.

The most common symptom of testicular cancer is a lump on your testicle. But that’s not the only sign of this disease.

Men who have testicular cancer may experience several different kinds of symptoms, says oncologist Timothy Gilligan, MD, a Medical Oncologist at Cleveland Clinic who specializes in treating testicular cancer.

Testicular cancer most frequently strikes men younger than age 44, and is the most commonly diagnosed cancer for men ages 15 to 34. It is almost always curable if found early, Dr. Gilligan says, and it is usually curable even when at a later stage. So it’s important to know signs and symptoms.

Here, Dr. Gilligan says, are five possible signs of testicular cancer you might not know about:

5 Testicular Cancer Symptoms That Aren’t a Lump  – Know what to look for and catch it early

  1. A feeling of heaviness or pressure in your scrotum.
  2. Change in testicle size or firmness.Certain types of testicular tumors can reduce testosterone or increase estrogen in the body, which can result in a change in testicle size or firmness.
  3. Swollen legs.When a tumor spreads to the lymph node, it can constrict blood flow in the veins and result in a blood clot. The clots often occur in the legs, which causes them to swell. You might even experience blood clot symptoms such as pain and difficulty breathing.
  4. Lower back pain and shortness of breath.These are symptoms of advanced testicular cancer, meaning the cancer has spread to lymph nodes behind your stomach. Shortness of breath also may signal that the cancer has spread to your lungs, which may make it harder for air to move in and out.
  5. Breast growth or tenderness.In rare cases, hormone changes also can cause breast tenderness or growth of breast tissue. Some tumors can secrete high levels of a hormone called human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), which stimulates breast development.

If you experience any of these symptoms, make an appointment with your doctor right away, Dr. Gilligan says. If your physician diagnoses you with epididymitis or orchitis and the symptoms do not resolve quickly with antibiotics, request an ultrasound to evaluate for a testicular tumor.

“While up to 95 percent of men with testicular cancer are cured, it’s important to get care quickly if you’re experiencing symptoms because testicular cancers usually grow fast,” Dr. Gilligan says. “If there is disease, the earlier it is treated, the greater than chance for success.”

 

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PDM Deputy Leader lends to Beach Vending Bill debate from outside Parliament

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By Dana Malcolm

Staff Writer

 

#TurksandCaicos, November 30, 2021 – The Opposition party says the new Beach and Coastal Vending bill does not provide adequate protection for TCI vendors.

This came from Deputy Leader of the PDM Robert Been, in an open letter to the Speaker of the House of Assembly earlier today.

The Deputy Leader who claimed to be in direct contact with vendors in Sapodilla say while there are several provisions for penalties against the vendors in the bill it does not ‘adequately address the protection of vendors rights.’

The PDM referenced incidents of abuse from homeowners against vendors and said, “These homeowners, very often, insult and threaten vendors which is humiliating…There needs to be, in the law, something that clearly penalizes any overreaching harassment by property owners…situated near vendors.”

The Opposition deputy leader also said the Premier’s claim that the reshuffle of vendors will not affect their earnings was ‘misleading’ and ‘held no truth.’ They added that the section of roadway cited for the relocation was a known hazard and tourists would likely not frequent the area.

The PDM had several other requests to make the bill a more viable one for vendors. Been insisted that the government produce a timeline for the temporary relocation and allocate funds for a stimulus in case of loss of earnings on the vendors’ part. They also requested to see compulsory marketing for the vendor markets and questioned the lack of any clear avenue for redress should the government default on its promises.

Finally the PDM Deputy Leader called for CCTV cameras to be installed at every vendor site for both the protection of vendors and their wares and objectivity in conflict resolution.

The office of the Premier has not yet responded to the letter. The bill will be debated in the House today (November 30).

 

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Assurances from Premier & Tourism Minister ahead of Beach Vendors Bill DEBATE  

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By Dana Malcolm

Staff Writer

 

#TurksandCaicos, November 30, 2021 – “I want to be clear from the outset; this Bill is in no way going to impact any family or individual who wants to enjoy the beaches of Turks and Caicos.” This was Premier Washington Misick’s response to public outcry surrounding the new Beach and Coastal Vending Bill.

The Bill, laid in Parliament last Monday, had several sections of concern to TCI Islanders and Premier Misick sought to explain in an exclusive interview with Magnetic Media.

He first addressed the issue of permits for special events on the beach assuring islanders they were not being ousted, saying.

“This Bill is in no way to restrict anyone from their public enjoyment of the beach…A special event has nothing to do with a family who wants to have a picnic on the beach…Once the regulations are public you will see that.”

He had a reminder for islanders though.

“The beach is a public good and it has to be regulated. If everyone is allowed to do what they want on the beach then nobody gets to enjoy the beach.”

In response to claims that the Bill was a result of Carnival Cruise’s imminent arrival the Premier stressed that the Bill was to protect TCI islanders and resources.

Tourism Minister Connolly also impressed the importance of the Bill, reminding TCI Islanders that tourism was a major source of income and that by protecting that industry that everyone would benefit, she said.

“This Bill is here to protect our people and to protect our beaches. Tourism is our greatest asset, we have to protect it.”

In defense of the policy Missick cited issues that had been reported saying that though the public might not be aware, they got reports about incidents of ‘vagrancy and miscreant behavior’ often.

“We’re getting reports of people walking beaches waking people from their naps and trying to sell them stuff… Even worse we are getting reports from the cruise center in Grand Turk that there have been incidents of people selling drugs, alcohol and prostitution and we can’t have that… So of course it has to do with protecting the tourism industry, but all TCI islanders benefit from tourism, you can’t disconnect one from the other.”

In response to the rearranging of vendors from their current positions Minister Connolly said that the new facilities were an ‘upgrade’ and there were provisions in place for every licensed vendor on Providenciales and Grand Turk.

Misick assured islanders that tourist traffic and revenue would not decrease in the new locations.

“When there is a cluster of businesses that are similar or ancillary to each other they end up feeding each other so this enhances people’s ability.”

Connolly also promised that the actual process of getting licensed and getting a space in these areas will be smooth.

“We are making it very easy for our people, you fill in your application…and we make sure that it is processed expeditiously.”

The licensing body which will have the power to approve, revoke and suspend licenses will comprise one individual each from the Police force, DECR, Planning industry, Marine office and Revenue Department. There was no mention of a representative from the Vending community.

The Bill mentioned that there will be a specific number of vendors in designated zones. When asked whether the number that was quoted would be sufficient for demand the Premier said.

“There will always be scarcity… but the whole thing is to have things properly organized and opportunities for people who bring different skills and products.” He also mentioned that they were working on creating even more spaces for vendors.

The Premier said that this Bill would put a stop to vendors having others ‘fronting’ for them. He dismissed any concern that the application process would be held up by any conflicts of interest or ‘family ties’ expressing complete confidence in the TCI auditing system.

The enforcement of these regulations would be carried out by the new Beach Patrol which would be trained and assisted by the police force and have power of arrest. The Tourism minister dismissed staffing concerns saying that they were in the process of training and shortlisting candidates.

The Beach and Coastal Vending Bill 2021 will enter debate stages on Tuesday, (November 30) the Premier invited islanders to attend and listen in for themselves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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