Connect with us

News

Guyanese Pilot Detained in Puerto Rico for US$620K Stashed in Private Jet

Published

on

Guyana Aviation Press Release, 27 Nov 2014 – A Guyanese pilot/businessman is currently being held in a Puerto Rican jail after he failed to disclose a large sum of cash which was hidden in several parts of the private jet he was onboard.

Khamraj Lall was the co-pilot onboard the jetliner bearing tail number N822QL when it stopped in the American annex of Puerto Rico to refuel.

United States Customs and Border Protection agents were conducting routine checks onboard the aircraft when they discovered large sums of the US currency totaling over $600,000. The airport agents had asked Lall and two other occupants to declare the money they were carrying. Lall was at the time traveling with his father and the pilot of the craft.

The pilot declared US$60 while together, the co-pilot and his father produced US$12,000. The hidden cash was found under a row of seats near to the plane’s exit and a suitcase with garbage bags of money was also found near the engine.

After the first sum of money was found under the seats, he told the authorities that it was proceeds from his business and he had forgotten that he had it there.

The authorities nonetheless continued their search, and found the remainder of cash near the engine. The pilot was then reported as taking full responsibility for the cash. He stated that his father and the pilot had nothing to do with the hidden money. The flight was said to be heading for Georgetown, Guyana.

Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Ramesh Ghir told Guyana Aviation that the local aviation authorities are “shocked” by the recent developments. Ghir confirmed that Lall is a Guyanese businessman who has a private hangar at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA).

He said the pilot was given permission some time back to construct the hangar where he is to conduct medical evacuations and other private flights out of Guyana. Lall is said to own two private jets.
However, after news of Lall’s detention surfaced, more information surfaced that the pilot was given special privileges at CJIA where he was allowed to forgo necessary customs and immigration among other security checks. Ghir and Minister of Transport, Robeson Benn both dismissed the claims declaring that all persons using the airport facilities have to go through the mandatory security procedures.

The facility is however located some distance away from CJIA’s arrival and departure building. The private hangar is very secluded. One has to turn right off the main road, to the southern end on the CJIA tarmac onto ‘Khali Road.’ This then takes you to the only building in that location of the airport.

There is a private security hut ahead of the hangar’s main building. No airport security is visible in this location.

Airport staffers told Guyana Aviation that because of the location, one can access the facility without authorities or anyone else ever knowing. This they say can be dangerous in terms of security, “while you may never know what kind of business is going on at the back there.”

It was stated also that Head of State Donald Ramotar would have traveled a few times on state business with the private jet. The bigger question asked was whether the flight was paid for with state funds or not. Benn opined that the flights could not have been free.

When asked, Ghir hinted to Guyana Aviation that it would not have been possible for the jet to smuggle money into or out of the country since it would have gone through the relevant security checks. The hangar is expected however to provide arrival and departure areas, executive lounges and spaces for customs and immigration agents among other facilities. The high-end clients will not have to go through the airport’s main arrival and departure facilities.
Currently, the private hangar is incomplete, Benn said. Much of the furnishings and internal work is to be concluded.

Lall who is said to have several other business ventures in Guyana, is expected to attend a bail hearing in Puerto Rico next week.

Magnetic Media is a Telly Award winning multi-media company specializing in creating compelling and socially uplifting TV and Radio broadcast programming as a means for advertising and public relations exposure for its clients.

News

Statement on Incident Involving Visitor on 2nd October 2022

Published

on

#TurksandCaicos, October 4, 2022 – The Government of the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) regrets the unfortunate incident involving the death of a visitor to our islands on 2nd October 2022.  The incident which occurred was accidental and not one in which the victim was targeted.  While the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police force (RTCIPF) continues their investigations, we wish to reassure the public (citizens, residents, and visitors alike) that the safety and security of all, is our top priority.

The TCI has long established itself as a safe destination for visitors from around the world.  Evidence of this can be seen in the countless awards the destination has won, most recently at the World Travel Awards.  Our commitment to providing safety to residents and visitors is unwavering.  The government will continue to work with local authorities including the RTCIPF and our partners in the international community to protect residents and visitors alike.

The incident which occurred on the date mentioned above is one that is rare and does not reflect who we are as a people.  On behalf of the government and people of these islands, we extend our sympathies to the family and friends of the victim.

As this matter is now an on-going police investigation, further statements will be referred to RTCIPF.

The TCI remains a safe destination and the government is working assiduously for it to remain as such.

Continue Reading

Bahamas News

Brave presentation in defence of Bahamas’ financial services reputation by PM Davis

Published

on

By Sherrica Thompson

Staff Writer

 

#TheBahamas, October 1, 2022 – Prime Minister of the Bahamas Phillip ‘Brave’ Davis is again calling for equality in the financial services sector and for the United Nations to leverage its universal jurisdiction for greater oversight of global anti-money laundering de-risking and tax cooperation matters.

In addressing the United Nations General Assembly on Saturday, September 24, Prime Minister Davis said the Bahamas is one of the best-regulated countries in the world, yet it has been under attack by international bodies and placed on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) blacklist while transgressions in the developed world are ignored.

He questioned why this was the case and highlighted some disparities in the financial sector.

“Why is it that European states that operate frameworks akin to that of high-risk or blacklisted countries, are not even eligible for inclusion on these lists? Why are all the countries targeted – all of them – small and vulnerable, and former colonies of European states? We find it astounding that the $2-$3 trillion dollars which is estimated to be laundered each year through the developed countries, are never flagged as causes for concern,” articulated Phillip Davis, addressing the 77th session in New York.

Prime Minister Davis further noted that there are elements of racism in the decision-making when it comes to regulating black-governed countries in the financial services sector. He also declared that black-governed countries matter as well.

And yet my country, which is widely recognized as one of the best-regulated countries in the world, and other countries like The Bahamas, are singled-out for such reputational attacks? The robust regulatory regimes of our Central Bank, Securities Commission, and Insurance Commission, are chastised on minor details of technical process, while much bigger transgressions in the developed world are ignored.

The evidence is mounting, that the considerations behind these decisions have less to do with compliance, and more to do with darker issues of pre-judged, discriminatory perceptions. Black-governed countries also matter.”

 Davis also highlighted the need for reforms that apply to all in the global financial system.

“Mr. President: We support the call for reforms in the global financial system to make it more relevant to the needs of today. But those reforms need ambition. They need to go beyond the incremental. And they need to apply to all. For example, the community of international financial institutions are in a position to forgive the debt incurred by the economic shutdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic. They should do so.”

Continue Reading

News

Will US President Biden deliver on Climate Change funding?

Published

on

By Dana Malcolm

Staff Writer

 

#USA, October 1, 2022 – US President Joe Biden has reiterated his promise that low income countries, which are also low carbon emitters will receive increased climate aid from the US to the tune of $11 billion per year.

The President was speaking at the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly recently where he maintained his administration was working with Congress to get the funds which would ‘help lower-income countries implement their climate goals and ensure a just energy transition.’

The plan was announced in September 2021 and is a reflection of the USA’s part in the 2010 global pledge made by developed countries to give $100 billion annually in climate financing to developing nations each year.  Biden has indicated that the plan will be in effect by 2024.

While he stressed at the UN that the need is ‘enormous’ the President is having trouble convincing lawmakers at home.  So far the funding which must be approved by Congress has not materialized. The United States Congress is known for having a particularly tight hold on the national purse in regards to climate change funding.

In fact congress dedicated only a little over $1 billion to climate change this year according to Bloomberg.  The US also has a history of promising funding for climate change but not delivering on those high priced promises.

Whether this $11 billion will actually get to nations like those in the Caribbean region is yet to be seen.

This year, the General Assembly heard from 190 speakers, including 76 Heads of State, 50 Heads of Government, four Vice-Presidents, five Deputy Prime Ministers, 48 Ministers and seven Heads of Delegations according to General Assembly President Csaba Kőrösi as he summed up the first in-person General Debate since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Continue Reading

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

TRENDING