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COVID-19: New UNDP data dashboards reveal huge disparities among countries in ability to cope and recover

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Indicators such as the level of poverty, healthcare capacity, access to internet and social protection can portray how severe the effects of the COVID-19 crisis might be in each of 189 countries.

#New York, April 29, 2020 – The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) today released two new data dashboards that highlight the huge disparities in countries’ abilities to cope with and recover from the COVID-19 crisis.

The pandemic is more than a global health emergency. It is a systemic human development crisis, already affecting the economic and social dimensions of development in unprecedented ways. Policies to reduce vulnerabilities and build capacities to tackle crises, both in the short and long term, are vital if individuals and societies are to better weather and recover from shocks like this.

Preparedness of countries to respond to COVID-19

UNDP’s Dashboard 1 on Preparedness presents indicators for 189 countries – including level of development, inequalities,  the capacity of a healthcare system and internet connectivity– to assess how well a nation can respond to the multiple impacts of a crisis like COVID-19. 

While every society is vulnerable to crises, their abilities to respond differs significantly around the world.

For example, the most developed countries – those in the very high human development category- have on average 55 hospital beds, over 30 physicians, and 81 nurses per 10,000 people, compared to 7 hospital beds, 2.5 physicians, and 6 nurses in a least developed country.

And with widespread lockdowns, the digital divide has become more significant than ever. 6.5 billion people around the globe – 85.5 percent of the global population – still don’t have access to reliable broadband internet, which limits their ability to work and continue their education. 

Vulnerabilities of countries in crisis like COVID-19

Preparedness is one thing. But, once a crisis hits, how vulnerable are countries to the fallout? UNDP’s Dashboard 2 on Vulnerabilities present indicators that reflect countries’ susceptibility to the effects of this crisis. y

Those already living in poverty are particularly at risk. Despite recent progress in poverty reduction, about one in four people still live in multidimensional poverty or are vulnerable to it, and more than 40 percent of the global population does not have any social protection. 

The COVID-19 pandemic also reminds us that disruptions in one place are contagious, triggering problems elsewhere. For example, in some countries, like Kyrgyzstan, a significant part of their GDP comes from remittances. While places as diverse as Montenegro, Maldives and Cabo Verde, rely heavily on tourism (almost 60% of GDP in the Maldives for example), which is being hit very hard by travel bans and lockdowns. 

Magnetic Media News working to extrapolate information; will publish at www.MagneticMediaTV.com in the coming days.

UNDP PRESS RELEASE

Magnetic Media is a Telly Award winning multi-media company specializing in creating compelling and socially uplifting TV and Radio broadcast programming as a means for advertising and public relations exposure for its clients.

Caribbean News

Yellow Fever Outbreak in Region and Beyond, Travellers Warned

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Rashaed Esson

Staff Writer 

 

#YellowFever#Caribbean, April 10, 2024 – Reports say there is an outbreak of Yellow fever in the Caribbean according to the Department of Health and official government advice website, Travel Health Pro, and travelers are being warned to be vigilant. The authorities say the outbreak is also in parts of Africa, and Central and South America.

Guyana and Peru so far have seen two cases. Brazil reports the disease in monkeys, an indication that it is spreading across the ccounty. Colombia has seen 3 cases.

In South America, between January 1 and March 18 2024, there have been seven confirmed cases, four fatal.

Yellow fever is spread by mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) and can cause potentially fatal hemorrhagic illness. Fortunately, it can be prevented with vaccination and so the World Health Organisation (WHO) is advising people ages nine months and older, traveling to the affected areas, to get vaccinated.

 

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world news

Expect regular Rocket launches as SpaceX program, blasts off!

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Garfield Ekon

Staff Writer

The last Falcon 9 lift off was on Friday morning at 5:12am.  The rocket dramatically pierced the dark skies of Cape Canaveral on April 5 as space exploration enthusiasts watched the live blast off and report “the Falcon 9 first stage booster, tail number B1069 in the SpaceX fleet, launched for a 14th time.”

But what is the origin story of these missions, which residents of The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos often witness from their quiet islands not too far off the coast of Florida.

SpaceX was founded on March 14, 2002, by United States (US) billionaire, Elon Musk, with a huge dream of building reusable rockets, commercial spacecraft, and a number of other sophisticated technology, now it is adding great benefits to normal live, and playing a dominant role in tourism.  

Two decades later, SpaceX is quietly leading in many spheres, with the building of 2,000-satalite, Starlink Internet constellation, for the holding of 30,000 spacecraft. It is advanced in ramping up an orbital space tourism programme, and for crewed missions to the International Space Station.

It is now regularly launching and landing rockets while carrying payloads for a wide range of customers, from private companies to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), while also making leaps for The Bahamas tourism industry, and cruise tourism.  

From a strategic collaboration, involving Space Exploration Technologies Corp, an exploration is being undertaken for a mission design, where one of the company’s autonomous drone ships will serve as a Falcon 9 landing location east of the Exumas, offering a spectacle that will be visible only in The Bahamas.

In August 2023, Royal Caribbean Group, disclosed plans to for implementation of SpaceX Starlink, making the entity the first in the cruise industry to adopt its high-speed, low-latency connectivity for a better onboard experience for guests and crew fleet-wide.

Deployment of the Starlink technology across the fleet, leveraged the awareness obtained from the trial onboard from Freedom of the Seas, which received tremendous positive feedback from guests and crew. 

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket, designated AV-085, will launch Boeing’s CST-100 Satrliner spacecraft on its first mission with astronauts, known as the Crest Test Flight, to the International Space Station, by the end of April. The rocket will fly in a vehicle configuration, with two solid rocket boosters, and a dual-engine Centaur upper stage.

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Africa

UN Sec Gen says Africans must be honoured, supports reparations

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Garfield Ekon

Staff Member

The millions of African who suffered under the brutal regime of slavery, must be honoured through reparatory justice, according to Secretary General of the United Nations (UN), António Guterres.

In his message to commemorate the International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, on Monday, he said many of those who organised and ran the slave trade, amassed huge fortunes, and the enslaved were deprived of education, healthcare, opportunity, and prosperity.

“We call for reparatory justice frameworks, to help overcome generations of exclusion and discrimination. We appeal for the space and necessary conditions for healing, repair, and justice. And above all, we resolve to work for a world free from racism, discrimination, bigotry, and hate. Together, as we remember the victims of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, let us unite for human rights, dignity, and opportunity for all,” he said.

Adding that the lives of the victims were ruled by terror, as they endured rape, floggings, lynchings and other atrocities and humiliations, he noted that it laid the foundations for a violent discrimination system based on white supremacy that still echoes today, and descendants of enslaved Africans and people of African descent are still fighting for equal rights and freedoms around the world.

The commemoration was held under the theme: “Celebrating Global Freedom: Countering Racism with Justice in Societies and Among Nations,” and delivering the keynote address, Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, who is the Chairman of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Commission on Reparation and Social Justice,  urged the world body to back a reparatory justice programme ,and end colonisation within the Caribbean.

“I urge the United Nations therefore, as part of its reparatory justice programme, to recommit to recommit to the agenda of decolonisation so that this crime against humanity which began in the Caribbean can finally come to an end with the ending of colonisation,” he said.

For over 400 years, more than 15 million men, women and children were the victims of the tragic transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest chapters in human history.

Professor Beckles stressed that the payment of moral and development reparations for the crimes against African people, will at the very beginning represent the formation of a “new and more equitable” global order that will represent a break from historical backwardness and lay the future for the dawn of a “dignified dispensation for all of humanity,” he told his audience.

A partnership has been forged between ta 55-member African Union and the Caribbean Community (Caricom) of 20 countries with an aim to intensify pressure on former slave-owning nations to engage with the reparation’s movement.

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