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OFFICIAL ISLANDS OF THE BAHAMAS 2022 HURRICANE SHELTER LISTING

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#TheBahamas, May 26, 2022 – The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) has released its Official List of Shelters for the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane Season which commences June 1 and ends November 30, 2022.

Weather forecasters at The Bahamas Department of Meteorology are predicting another above-average season with 19 named storms, including  9 hurricanes, four of which are expected to become major hurricanes (Category 3 or higher with maximum sustained winds of 111mph or higher) on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale.

There are two main drivers for this Season’s forecast: An El Nino weather event is not expected in the Pacific during the 2022 Hurricane Season, and water temperatures in the Atlantic are hotter than normal. When an El Nino forms in the Pacific, it produces strong wind-shear in the upper levels of the atmosphere across the Atlantic Ocean which limits the formation of hurricanes. Warm ocean temperatures in the Atlantic, on the other hand, fuels the formation of hurricanes. With the absence of an El Nino, the 2022 Season is expected to be active.

The names of the 2022 Atlantic storm are as follows: Alex, Bonnie, Colin, Danielle, Earl, Fiona, Gaston, Hermine, Ian, Julia, Karl, Lisa, Martin, Nicole, Owen, Paula, Richard, Shary, Tobias, Virginie, and Walter.

The National Emergency Management Agency urges all Bahamians and residents, who have not already done so, to finalize their individual, family and business plans ahead of the start of the Season. Those plans should include an Emergency Supplies/Preparedness Kit that should include a small First Aid Kit and needed medications, non-perishable food items, battery powered radios, flashlights, extra batteries, hygiene products, masks, whistles (for alerting others if necessary), copies of important documents such as insurance papers and identification (sealed), a list of emergency numbers, cash in small bills, rope, tools, and clothing.

 

MINISTRY OF SOCIAL SERVICES AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT  DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES ISLANDS OF THE BAHAMAS 2022 OFFICIAL HURRICANE SHELTERS

(UPDATED AS AT 13 MAY, 2022)

 

ABACO, CENTRAL DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Central Abaco Primary School Dundas Town
2. Friendship Tabernacle Dundas Town
3. Guana Cay Primary School Guana Cay
4. Man-O-War Primary School Man-O-War Cay
5. Hope Town Primary School Hope Town

ABACO, NORTH DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Amy Roberts Primary Pre-School Green Turtle Cay
2. Faithwalk Church of God, Community Centre Cooper’s Town
3. Grand Cay All Age School Pre-school Block Grand Cay

 ABACO, SOUTH DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Crossing Rocks Primary School Crossing Rocks
2. Moore’s Island School Moore’s Island
3. Sandy Point Community Centre Earnest Dean Highway
4. Soul Seeking Ministry Moore’s Island

 ACKLINS

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Acklins Community Centre Spring Point

 ANDROS, CENTRAL DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Bowen Sound Pentecostal Church Bowen Sound
2. Church of God Cargill Creek
3. Highway Church of God Blanket Sound
4. Miracle Revival International Calabash Bay
5. Mt. Ethel Baptist Love Hill
6. Mt. Siani Baptist Church Calabash Bay
7. St. Bartholomew’s Anglican Church Behring Point
8. Stafford Creek Primary School Stafford Creek

 ANDROS, MANGROVE CAY DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Burnt Rock Primary Burnt Rock
2. Mangrove Cay High School Swains, Mangrove Cay
3. St. Peters Baptist Church Little Harbour, Mangrove Cay

 ANDROS, NORTH DISTRICT

NO.                               NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. B. A. Newton Primary School Red Bays
2. BARTAD Building BARC Community
3. Clara Evans Primary School Nicholls Town
4. Ebenezer Baptist Church South Mastic Point
5. First Baptist Church San Andros

 ANDROS, SOUTH DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Deep Creek Primary School Deep Creek
2. Friendship Baptist Church The Bluff
3. Long Bays Cay Preschool Long Bay
4. Mount Olive Baptist Church Smith’s Hill
5. St. Paul’s Baptist Church Black Point
6. The Doctor’s Residence (Special Needs Clinic) The Bluff

 BERRY ISLANDS, GREAT HARBOUR CAY

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Church of God of Prophecy Great Harbour Cay
2. Community Centre Bullocks Harbour

 BIMINI

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Gateway Gymnasium Bailey Town
2. Louise McDonald High School Alice Town
3. Urban Renewal (Special Needs Shelter) Alice Town

 CAT ISLAND

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Lovely Zion Baptist Church The Bluff
2. Mt. Sinai Baptist Church Douds
3. Seaview Seventh Day Adventist Church Wilson Bay
4. St. Andrew’s Anglican Church Arthur’s Town
5. St. Mark’s Anglican Church Port Howe
6. Zion Baptist Church McQueen’s

 CROOKED ISLAND & LONG CAY

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
             1. All Saints Anglican Church, Priest Residence

(Colonel Hill and Church Grove Residents)

 

Church Grove, Crooked Island

             2. Church of God of Prophecy

(Landrail Point, Richmond, Moss Town and Cripple Hill Residents)

 

Cripple Hill, Crooked Island

             3. Command Centre

Administrator’s Residence/Local Government Building

 

Colonel Hill, Crooked Island

             4. Kenneth Farquharson’s Residence

(Long Cay Residents)

 

Albert Town, Long Cay

 ELEUTHERA, CENTRAL DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Camp Symonette James Cistern, Gregory Town
2. Church of The Nazarene Palmetto Point
3. Emily G. Petty Primary School Governor’s Harbour
4. George E. Johnson Hatchet Bay
5. The Salvation Army Palmetto Point
6. Wesley Methodist Church Hall Palmetto Point

 ELEUTHERA, NORTH DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Charles Wesley Methodist Church Lower Bogue
2. Mission Church of God Upper Bogue
3. New Jerusalem Church Blackwood
4. The Current Community Centre The Current
5. The Haitian Baptist People Church The Bluff
6. Zion Methodist Church Current Island

 ELEUTHERA, SOUTH DISTRICT

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Church of God of Prophecy Tarpum Bay
2. Deep Creek Primary School Deep Creek
3. Green Castle Primary School Green Castle
4. Rock Sound Primary School Rock Sound
5. Wemyss Bight Primary School Wemyss Bight

 EXUMA

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
                    1. Bethel Union Baptist Church Ramsey
                    2. Calvary Mission Baptist Church Rolleville
                    3. Ebenezer Union Baptist Church Farmer’s Hill
                    4. Ebenezer Union Baptist Church Barraterre
                    5. Exuma Resource Centre Hoopers’ Bay
                    6. Gethsemane Baptist Church Black Point
                    7. Mt. Herman Union Baptist Church Mt. Thompson
                    8. Mt. Sinai Union Baptist Church Stuart Manor
                    9. Palestine Union Baptist Church The Forest
                10. St. Andrew’s Community Centre George Town
                11. St. Luke’s Baptist Church and/or Airport Terminal Black Point
                12. St. Margaret’s Anglican Church Harts/Steventon
                13. St. Mary’s Magdalene  Anglican Church Williams Town
                14. St. Matthew’s Union Baptist Church The Ferry
                15. St. Theresa’s Catholic Church George Town

 GRAND BAHAMA

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
                    1. Bethany Baptist Church Hanna Hill, Eight Mile Rock
                    2. Bethel Baptist Church Pinedale
                    3. Bethel Deliverance Centre Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock
                    4. Bishop Michael Eldon School/Auditorium East Beachway Drive, Freeport
                    5. Calvary Temple Small Chapel Clive Avenue, Freeport
                    6. Central Zion Baptist Church Eight Mile Rock
                    7. Church of God of Prophecy Pinedale
                    8. Church of the Ascension Arden Forest Road, Freeport
                    9. Community Holiness Church Martin Town
                10. Eight Mile Rock Gymnasium Eight Mile Rock
                11. Eight Mile Rock High School Eight Mile Rock
                12. First Baptist Church Columbus Drive, Freeport
                13. Foster B. Pestina Hall (Christ the King) (Special Needs Shelter) East Atlantic Drive, Freeport
                14. Maurice Moore Primary School Sandcombe Drive, Arden Forest, Freeport
                15. Mount Calvary Baptist Educational Building Seagrape
                16. New Olivet Baptist Church Holmes Rock
                17. St. George’s Gymnasium Sunset Highway, Freeport
                18. Shiloh Seventh Day Adventist Church Sandcombe Drive, Freeport

 HARBOUR ISLAND

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. Harbour Island Public Library Harbour Island
2. Lighthouse Church of God Harbour Island
3. New Alliance Church of God Harbour Island

 

 INAGUA

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. New Life Seventh-Day Adventist Church Matthew Town
2. St. Phillips Anglican Community Centre Matthew Town
3. Zion Baptist Church Matthew Town

 LONG ISLAND

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
       1. Assemblies of God Salt Pond
       2. Community Centre Clarence Town
       3. Highway Church of God Doctors Creek
       4. Holy Cross Anglican Church Hamiltons
       5. Holy Family Anglican Church Mortimers
       6. Salem Baptist Church Millers
       7. St. John’s Anglican Church Buckleys
       8. Seymour’s Gospel Chapel Seymour’s

 MAYAGUANA

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
1. St. James Native Baptist Church Abraham’s Bay
2. Betsy Bay Community Centre Betsy Bay
3. Mayaguana Comprehensive K- School Pirate’s Well

 NEW PROVIDENCE

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
       1. Agape Full Gospel Baptist Church Kennedy Subdivision
       2. Berea Seventh-Day Adventist Church Baillou Hill Road South
       3. Canon Neil E. Roach Hall, Holy Cross Anglican Church Highbury Park
       4. Church of God Convention Centre (for use by SRC) Joe Farrington Road
       5. Ebenezer Mission Baptist Evangelistic Church St. Charles Vincent Street
       6. Epworth Hall, Ebenezer Methodist Church

(for use by Homeless and People with Physical Disabilities)

 

Shirley Street

       7. Grants Town Seventh-Day Adventist Church Wellington Street
       8. Hillview Seventh-Day Adventist Church Tonique Williams Darling Highway
       9. Maranatha Seventh-Day Adventist Church Prince Charles Drive
   10. New Bethlehem Baptist Church Independence Drive
   11. New Dimensions Ministries Joe Farrington Road
   12. New Providence Community Centre Blake Road
   13. Pilgrim Baptist Temple St. James Road
   14. St. Barnabas Anglican Church Wulff Road and Baillou Road
   15. Rev. Dr. O. A. Pratt Educational Building,

St. John’s Native Baptist Church

 

Augusta and Meeting Streets

   16. Samuel and Cornella Williams Community Centre,

The Salvation Army

 

Meadow Street

   17. Southwest Cathedral Church of God Carmichael Road
   18. The Anglican Church of the Epiphany Prince Charles Drive
   19. The Salvation Army Mackey Street

 RAGGED ISLAND

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
         1. Holy Innocents Anglican Church Duncan Town

 SAN SALVADOR AND RUM CAY

NO. NAME OF SHELTER ADDRESS
       1. Fellowship in Christ Kingdom Ministry Cockburn Town
       2. Grace Research Center United Estates Settlement
       3. Idell Jones Community Hall, St. Augustine Church Hall Cockburn  Town
       4.              St. Christopher Anglican Church Port Nelson, Rum Cay
       5. St. James Native Baptist Church North Victoria Hill
       6. St. John’s Native Baptist Church United Estates

@ 9 May, 2022 DOSS, Disaster Management Unit

 PLEASE NOT THAT THIS LIST IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE; IF NECESSARY

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GBPA welcomes EY’s New Office to Freeport

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#TheBahamas, June 22, 2022 – The Grand Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) has approved a business license for EY Bahamas Ltd., who is set to open a new office in Freeport.

With more than 300,000 employees globally, EY provides assurance, consulting, law, strategy, tax and transactions services to businesses, countries and entrepreneurs. Significant economic impact from this investment will stem from the need for local housing, food and beverage, entertainment, transportation and more.

“We are pleased to welcome EY to Freeport,” said Ian Rolle, GBPA’s President.  “GBPA has been working with EY to take advantage of the BH-1B Visa program, which provides a significant opportunity for us to welcome more people to our city. We are looking forward to the economic boost to local businesses including grocery stores, taxis, car rentals, the housing market, restaurants and more. The ripple effects as a result of EY’s new footprint in Freeport will be a positive addition to our business community.”

GBPA and EY began serious discussions in 2019 prior to Hurricane Dorian regarding the benefits of operating in Freeport’s Special Economic Zone.  Since then, GBPA continued building its relationship with the firm and further helped them to understand the benefits of the BH-1B visa, which allows them to use Freeport to support their client’s needs across the region and globe.  Besides attracting local Bahamian and international talent, EY was drawn to Freeport’s proximity to North America, its safe environment, technology infrastructure and more.

EY has operated in The Bahamas for decades, providing rewarding careers for Bahamians. In its new Freeport location, EY will offer its clients solutions utilizing global talent, while creating new opportunities for employment and training for Grand Bahamians.

“Our Invest Grand Bahama promotional arm is dedicated to attracting these types of businesses that can benefit from our unique Free Trade Zone. We will continue to do our part as we promote the best Freeport has to offer,” Mr. Rolle concluded.

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RM Bailey’s Class of 2022 told, go where your heart leads you; be courageous, innovative, be your best

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By: Kathryn Campbell

Bahamas Information Services

 

#TheBahamas, June 22, 2022 – Vice-President of the Senate, Senator the Hon. Barry Griffin appealed to R.M. Bailey Senior High School’s Class of 2022 to be advocates of change and to use their voices to encourage good governance and constant innovation.

Senator Griffin was the guest speaker at the school’s commencement exercise Monday, June 20, at Charles Saunders Auditorium. “Empowered to Make What Seems Impossible – Possible” was the theme for the event.

“What we need now from our leaders is a sense of urgency. There has long been this feeling in The Bahamas, and in particular the upper echelons of our country, that we have comfort and we can manage to navigate the twists and turns that come our way,” said Senator Griffin.

“But what Hurricane Dorian has taught us, what the pandemic has taught us, what the inflation and rising costs of gas, electricity and food has taught us is — something that those at the fringes of our society have known for far too long — that comfort we feel will not last for long.”

To make the change, he remarked that the love of an old  “anachronistic” system that no longer serves the nation and its students must be removed.

He appealed for expanded opportunities for all, structural changes in the economy and in politics.

“We must begin to call a spade a spade — we have a problem of inequality, a problem of equal access to opportunity and a problem of failed politics. And graduates the only way that changes, is by you making your voices heard.”

He offered the following advice to the graduates:

  1. The old rules are crumbling and nobody knows what the new rules are. So make up your own rules.
  2. Start where you are, use what you have, do what you can.
  3. When you take risks, you learn that there will be times when you succeed and there will be times when you fail, both are equally important.
  4. Be bold, be courageous, be your best.
  5. There is no script. Live your life the way you want.
  6. Wherever you go, go with all your heart.
  7. If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.
  8. Failure is the condiment that gives success flavour.
  9. Don’t wait. The time will never be just right.
  10. Go where your heart leads you — and do everything you desire — act as if it were impossible for you to fail.

“My advice is to be bold, to be you, to embrace failure, and to live as if everything is possible.

“It is my hope that you run out of here excited, leaning forward into the wind and ready to take the world by storm,” he said.

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Summit of the Americas elevates hemispheric challenges, Bahamas PM vocal

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By Shanieka Smith

Features Writer

 

#TheBahamas, June 17, 2022 – “The Americas are challenged by crisis.” This was the statement made by the Bahamas Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, the Hon. Philip Davis during his contribution to the Plenary Session of the 9th Summit of the Americas on June 10, 2022.

“Climate, COVID and conflict have undermined our safety and our security,” he said. He went further to ask some thought-provoking questions: “Have we done enough here, at this gathering, to relieve suffering? To promote peace? To fight for the economic dignity of our People? “Will the work we carried out here continue once the spotlight and the world’s attention has moved on?”

He said the work and fine words do not count unless the people are told that the leaders have laid a true foundation for their progress.

Hinting back to the Summit in 2019, he said it is evident that the good intentions and optimism of that gathering did not translate into enduring advancement.

“Indeed, some countries in our hemisphere have become more unequal and more violent… across the Americas, the scourges of racism and discrimination appear to be on the rise. Emerging moral and technological challenges to our democratic norms threaten our capacity to deliver free and fair elections, and effective governance.” He added that all the mentioned challenges are “eclipsed by the existential threat of climate change.”

He expressed thanks to President Biden and Vice-President Harris and the people of the United States, to host and facilitate the dialogue and cooperation because none of the mentioned issues can be resolved by one nation.

Davis added, however, that “multilateral engagement at the highest levels happens too infrequently – certainly when it comes to issues which are important to the Caribbean,” he added. “But if the work of this Summit continues, if the will to cooperate endures, if words turn into action –change can lead to progress, and we can move forward.”

He highlighted several key factors affecting the region’s development, like hurricanes and other natural disasters that result in injury and debt, Covid-19 and the lack of sufficient healthcare workers, disinformation, and the illegal shipment of guns and movement of people. He also hinted at a topical issue, which suited the occasion as some countries were not invited to the Summit.

“It is easy to talk with those with whom we agree, but we must also be able to talk with those with whom we disagree. In fact, sometimes those are the conversations that are most urgently needed,” he said.  Prime Minister Davis noted that all the countries in the hemisphere faced overlapping developmental, security and democratic challenges. Collaboration and collective action can only be of mutual benefit. The absence of the Republic of Cuba has made these deliberations less complete,” added the Prime Minister.

“We must also be mindful of the unintended consequences of isolation and separation,” he said as he shared that more could be done to provide support for Haitians.

He noted that for the institutions within the Inter-American system to fulfil their potential, there should be some rethinking or re-calibrating. He added that the Organisation of American States (OAS), in particular, required both a structural and cultural adjustment.

As the Prime Minister ended his presentation, he called for not just more talking but also that participants “keep ‘doing — upholding our commitments and taking the action necessary for our collective survival.”

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