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Bahamas Achievements Admirable Says Minister Pintard at 44th Independence Celebrations in Grand Bahama

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Bahamas, July 7, 2017 – Grand Bahama – As the country celebrates its 44th Independence on July 10 some of the best and brightest Bahamians have made contributions in many spheres internationally, said Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, the Hon. Michael Pintard during the Flag Raising Ceremony on Friday.

GREETING THE HONOR GUARDThe ceremony is part of the 44th Anniversary of Independence celebrations.  “Our small national has become the envy, not just of the region but countries around the world who have understudied what we have done in tourism and in financial services. Even in crisis, we continue to prove we are resilient and powerful. In the aftermath of the blacklisting, we produce a cadre of compliance officers who designed one of the sophisticated compliance regimes that assisted this region in getting back on track.

“Therefore, this morning as we raise our flag, we salute all those nation builders on whose shoulders we stand, some with title and many with no name or face recognition but, nevertheless, they played a pivotal role in transforming life as we know it in The Bahamas. So, we salute them. We also acknowledge that there are many unrealized dreams that we have set, and there are some stubborn issues that threaten the gains that we have made thus far. This Minnis led government believes that the collective will and genius of the Bahamian people will enable us to grow our economy once again; reduce the high incidences of crime and the high occurrences of non-communicable and other diseases. We are determined to forge deeper relationships with all Bahamians, regardless of their political persuasion, religious differences, differences in race. All of us have to be on the same page if we are to transform this country for the better.”

Minister Pintard saluted all those who had the insight and courage 44 years ago who felt it was time for the country to govern its own affairs and sit at international tables as equals.

“The pursuit and achievement of Independence on the 10th of July, 1973, was an acknowledgement that we ought to be the main agents, the main architects designing our own future and managing the growth and development of our own country. We accepted the challenge undergirded by our faith in God and the confidence in our collective ability as a people.

“Over the last four decades plus, despite all of our challenges, we’ve accomplished I believe you would agree with me this morning, a great deal as a people. In the international sphere, our voice factored loudly. When we engaged as a global community in the discussion of disarmament, there was a Bahamian chairing many of those sessions, Dr. Davidson Hepburn. In international diplomacy our own Missouri Sherman-Peters impacted the significant work done by the United Nations, and our first Prime Minister, Sir Lynden Oscar Pindling’s voice resonated internationally as we dismantled as a global community Apartheid’s wall and rebuilt in its place, a multiracial South Africa that even today is working to forge a lasting peace.”

The country has made contributions all over the world, he said. “In academics, we continue to produce multiple Rhode’s scholars, scientists that are impacting the world both in technology, just ask NASA and in medicine as we travel throughout particularly Africa assisting on many levels. We have set a standard. Many of our scholars have sat international standardized exams and performed as well, and often better, than their colleagues who hail from around the globe.

“We are good as anyone else, anywhere else in the world.

“Sons and daughters of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas have caused tens of millions around the world to pause and salute The Bahamas as our flag has been raised in numerous stadiums around the world where track and field took place, in aquatic centres where swimming took place, on the shores even in Regattas. Our amateur and elite athletes have made a difference, have made us proud and have made the world take note.”

He added, “This morning, we salute all of you who continue to engage in this nation building exercise. Bahamians, those that have chosen to cast their lot with us and have moved to The Bahamas. Diplomats who have worked with us on an ongoing basis, we look forward to working with you to frame a democracy that will be envied.

“This year’s theme, “One God, One People, One Bahamas” is a most appropriate reminder of the core values that have held us together since Independence.”

Also present for the flag raising ceremony, held at the Harold Degregory Complex were: Senator the Hon. Dion Foulkes, Minister of Labour; Senator the Hon. J. Kwasi Thompson, Minister of State for Grand Bahama in the Office of the Prime Minister along with other Members of Parliament, senior government officials and religious leaders.

While the ceremony was taking place in Freeport, Senate president, the Hon. Kay Forbes-Smith was present with Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, the Hon. K. Peter Turnquest in East Grand Bahama. Parliamentary Secretary in the Ministry of Public Works, the Hon. Iram Lewis and Parliamentary Secretary of Information and Communications in the Office of the Prime Minister, the Hon. Pakesha Parker-Edgecombe were in West Grand Bahama. All three areas held Flag Raising Ceremonies simultaneously.

THE HON. MICHAEL PINTARD, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture (BIS Photo/Andrew Coakley)

SALUTING THE FLAGSALUTE TO THE FLAG – Senior government officials and officers of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and Defence Force, are seen during the Flag Raising Ceremony of the 44th Anniversary of Independence ceremony on Friday at the Harold Degregory Complex. Shown in the front row from left are: Assistant Commissioner of Police, Clarence Reckley; Andrew Bowe, Senior Lt./Executive Officer of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force and OC of Grand Bahama; and Deputy Commission of Police and OC of Grand Bahama, Emrick Seymour; Senator the Hon. Dion Foulkes, Minister of Labour; the Hon. Michael Pintard, Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture; Senator the Hon. J. Kwasi Thompson, Minister of State

for Grand Bahama in the Office of the Prime Minister and Rev. Peter Pinder, president, Grand Bahama Christian Council.

Story by: Robyn Adderley

Press Release: BIS

(BIS Photo/Andrew Coakley)

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Bahamas Prime Minister Speaks at 76th Session of UN General Assembly

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SATURDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 2021

“Building resilience through hope – to recover from COVID-19, rebuild sustainably, respond to

the needs of the planet, respect the rights of

people and revitalize the United Nations” Introduction

 

 

#TheBahamas, September 26, 2021 – Esteemed Colleague Heads of State and Heads of Government, Distinguished Delegates, Ladies and Gentlemen;

Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres;

President of the General Assembly, Foreign Minister Abdulla Shahid of the Maldives:

On September 16th, Bahamian citizens took to the polls to make their voices heard.   It is an honour to meet with you fewer than ten days after this peaceful exercise of the democratic process.

I wish to extend congratulations to the

Maldives, a sister Small Island Developing State, on their election to the helm of this General Assembly. Know that you will find The Bahamas to be a strong, engaged and thoughtful partner for the road ahead.

We also congratulate Secretary-General Gutteres on his re-election to a second term, and wish him every success.

Colleagues, we are meeting at a most extraordinary time. We come here from different corners of the earth, with our theme — “building resilience through hope” – reflecting our shared determination to pivot from crisis to opportunity.

These crises are inter-connected and multifaceted, and need a global response.    We must collaborate to end the Covid-19 pandemic and address public health issues.

We must co-operate to mitigate the effects of climate change.

And access to development financing must be equitable and fair.

An inadequate response to these issues will have dire consequences for the global economy.

 

Collaborating to End the Pandemic

The world has changed enormously since we first learned about the COVID-19 virus.

This crisis made abundantly clear what has always been true: we’re all in this together.

In every country, we have lost loved ones. We have seen our healthcare workers battle bravely. We have contended with disruption, uncertainty, and grief.

We have benefited from extraordinary cooperation and achievements in science, but we also had to contend with misinformation and disinformation,  and insufficient attempts to curb bad actors propagating the same. Bad information has flowed across borders, undermining public health and public trust.

The pandemic has been very difficult for countries like mine. We face an extraordinary need for new resources in health and education and housing just as our economy is contracting dramatically.

Our inter-connected world means that we will only be safe when all countries, including mine, have the tools needed to fight this virus.

This requires the equitable distribution of vaccines. That includes distribution to Small Island Developing States, who are not manufacturers. Stockpiling for self-preservation is a fallacy.

You will only be safe when we are all safe!

I wish to thank the Government and People of the United States for their donations of vaccines to The Bahamas and the wider Caribbean region.

This gift, alongside donations received previously from India, China, Antigua & Barbuda, and Dominica, will save many Bahamian lives. This is in addition to the ongoing support of PAHO, CARPHA and the COVAX facility and the regional collaboration among CARICOM countries.

But this is still not enough. We need more. Our demand for vaccines has significantly outstripped supply.

Along with vaccines, it is important that safe treatments and therapeutics, are made accessible and designated as public goods. We need to fortify critical global supply chains, and distribution mechanisms, so that we can win this battle, and be better prepared for the next one.      You will only be safe, when we are all safe!    The Bahamas joins those reiterating the need to fully fund the ‘Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator’ and its COVAX facility. And we reiterate our alignment with CARICOM’s call for continued high-level engagement to urgently address access to vaccines.

When vaccines are deployed to reduce transmission, everyone is made safer –  not just the direct recipient.  We can, by doing so, reduce the opportunities for new and more dangerous variants to emerge. This virus is  global and requires a global response. COP26 Matters/ Disasters Response

Colleagues, even before COVID-19 shut down my country’s borders, we were dealing with a catastrophic shock to our economy and our country.

Two years ago this month, one of the strongest storms ever recorded in the Atlantic caused catastrophic damage to our islands of Abaco and Grand Bahama.

Hurricane Dorian was strengthened by waters that were well above average temperatures; the earth’s changing climate means that hurricanes like Dorian linger longer and cause more damage.

The devastation caused by this storm is part of our country’s landscape; the physical and emotional wreckage are still with us.

Recently I spoke with a woman who lost her husband and her three children in the storm. Every rainfall is a reminder of the horror. How can we continue to do nothing in the face of such tragedy?

The very worst thing about Dorian is our sense of foreboding – our sense that this hurricane, which took so much from so many – is only the beginning.

None of us believe this is a once-in-a-generation storm. Instead, we know it is a nightmare that could easily recur – tomorrow, next week, next month.

To any leader who believes we still have plenty of time to address climate change, I invite you to visit Abaco and Grand Bahama.

For island nations such as ours, climate change is here. And is a real and present danger.

Before Hurricane Dorian in 2019, we faced hurricanes: in 2015, in 2016, and in 2017.  We cannot survive this “new normal”.

Thus, we are not here to call for measured steps. We are here to say that big and radical change is the only response that can save our country. We are out of time.

We stand with CARICOM countries and Small Island Developing States to remind the world that those who are hit hardest by the impact of climate change, are the least responsible.

The recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Report warned that avoiding the worst outcomes requires immediate action; this is, as the Secretary-General noted, a ‘Code Red’ moment.

Our countries disproportionately bear the burden of the “Recovery Trap”, in which we attempt to rebuild to the tune of billions – billions we never had, even before COVID.

 

Colleagues, in a few short weeks, we will meet in Glasgow, Scotland.

The 26th Climate Change Conference cannot be like the twenty-five that preceded it – we cannot pretend that incremental change is sufficient. We cannot set goals we have no intention of meeting. We cannot keep postponing the change we need for countries like mine to survive.

If we are the serious leaders these times require, we must raise our ambitions, and make real commitments to cut emissions.

We must make real progress on bridging the divides in investment, and access-to-technology and skills, especially in areas relevant to climate mitigation and adaptation.

We must strengthen technical assistance for creating, nationally-determined contribution (NDC) commitments, along with commensurate ‘implementation financing’.

We must give teeth and substance to the mechanism for loss and damage if it is to be a meaningful tool for supporting fair recovery, and not simply an exercise in defining and highlighting disaster risk.

Along with our sister nations in CARICOM,

The Bahamas calls for greater climate financing and the need for more engagement and progress on a Climate Investment Platform.

And, as a matter of priority, more innovative financing and debt solutions are needed, including debt for climate adaptation swaps. We also look forward to the capitalization of a Caribbean Resilience Fund. We also need adequate resourcing and timely access to the ‘Green Climate Fund’ and the ‘Climate Finance Accelerator’.

In our just-concluded campaign, we called for new renewable energy initiatives in our own country. We are going to build structural and economic resilience, in a green recovery, with plans to invest in climate-smart infrastructure and environmental protection.

The Bahamas will lead on wetland and ocean preservation, and we will seek re-election to the International Maritime Organization. We look forward to the Biodiversity Conference

next month; we are committed to the successful conclusion of negotiations towards an international treaty to conserve marine bio-diversity.  Advancing an MVI/ Affordable, Accessible Development Financing

Colleagues, the compounding impact of economic, environmental, and now public health shocks, means that access to affordable finance will be the real driver of progress in the near and long term.

The global development financing gap for meeting Sustainable Development Goals by

2030, estimated in 2019 to be $2.5 trillion, is only increasing.

Today we reiterate our country’s support for the inclusion of a Multi-dimensional Vulnerability Index in the decision-making of international financial institutions, and the international donor community.

On a related front, we believe that access to the global financial system and tax cooperation should not be undermined: by ad hoc and consistently shifting and arbitrary goal posts, and threats of exclusion from the global economy.

Financial Services is a crucial component of the Bahamian economy. We see an indispensable role for the UN in leveraging its universal jurisdiction for greater oversight of global antimoney laundering, de-risking and tax cooperation matters.

Cuba

On a separate note, I wish to convey The Bahamas’ rejection of the ongoing economic blockade of our sister Caribbean nation of Cuba.

Conclusion

As I conclude, I recall the words of our nation’s first Prime Minister, Sir Lynden Pindling, as he stood here 48 years ago this month, on the occasion of our nation’s accession to the United Nations.

He spoke about the journey of our people, from slavery to colonialism to sovereign independence.

He spoke of our country’s wish to be neither dominated nor coerced, and our wish to build friendships with nations who respected our freedom.

He could not have foreseen at that time the challenges we face today, with intensifying hurricanes and a deadly virus that has left no nation untouched. But he saw already that “no nation is an island unto itself” and spoke of the interdependence of all countries.    That interdependence has never been clearer.

Rest assured, colleagues, that in The Bahamas you will find a trusted partner, committed to moving forward on our collective goals for sustainable development, security, and peace.

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Government committed to swift and successful execution of strategic plans for GB

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#TheBahamas, September 24, 2021 – Newly appointed Minister for Grand Bahama, the Hon. Ginger Moxey arrived in Freeport on Friday, September 24, 2021 and spent her first official day in office, at the Office of the Prime Minister.  The Grand Bahama Minister immediately talked about plans to revive the economy of Grand Bahama.

“In commencing this role, I reiterate my pledge to inspire hope, enable opportunities and deliver results for the people of Grand Bahama,” Minister Moxey said during a press conference in her office.

“Our island has been unbelievably challenged by natural disasters and a strained economy for far too long.  However, despite our challenges, Grand Bahamians remain remarkably resilient.  As your Minister, I am excited to journey with you as we recover, rebuild and revolutionize the island of Grand Bahama.”

The Davis Administration, she added, has implemented strategic plans to achieve this goal.  Minister Moxey said that the government is committed to the swift and successful execution of those plans.

“The first thing I wanted to do was to get into office, because there is so much work to do,” said Minister Moxey. “There are so many people hurting in the community and there are so many projects that need to be tackled.

“We have the situation with the airport. We know that the Grand Bahama International Airport was sold to the government, so we have to get the ball rolling with that and develop a master plan for the airport.  Of course there will be a lot of collaboration that’s involved. We have to meet with the private sector and the regulators.

“There is the situation with the Lucayan Resort and that is something that we will look into and try to figure out how to resolve the issues that may exist there.  But we have a plan for the island in general.”

Minister Moxey noted that Grand Bahama had been in the doldrums long before Hurricane Dorian and the COVID-19 Pandemic, pointing out that the island’s economy began to go downhill from the passing of Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne in 2004 and 2005.

She has vowed to work with diligence to begin delivering immediate social relief to Grand Bahamians and much-needed reconstruction on the island.  It is envisioned that this will, in turn, assist in the government’s mission to stabilize the economy of Grand Bahama and create opportunities for Bahamians to thrive.

“In general, we want to empower Bahamians and to empower Grand Bahamians, because that is what will help us move forward,” Minister Moxey added.   “It’s a lot of work that needs to be done and we would like the entire community to join us as we bring these objectives to pass.

“All that Grand Bahama needs will not happen overnight.  It will take some time to get Grand Bahama to the place where we all would like to see it.  So, we want the public to bear with us as we weed through all that has been going on.

“I’m about creating systems that allow for things to happen. We would like to see results, but we have to know what we need to put in place to get results.  I love the island of Grand Bahama and the people of Grand Bahama.  So, as I settle into this new role as Minister for Grand Bahama, I will do my best and work around the clock to turn things around.”

Minister Moxey said that she was proud to be the first woman to hold the title of Minister for Grand Bahama, and it is her hope that she would be able to inspire the future of women in leadership.

 

PHOTO CAPTION

BIS Photos/Lisa Davis

Header: Newly appointed Minister for Grand Bahama, the Hon. Ginger Moxey met with the press in her office at the Ministry of Grand Bahama on Friday, September 24, 2021.

Insert: Permanent Secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister (Grand Bahama), Mr. Harcourt Brown greeted newly appointed Minister for Grand Bahama, the Hon. Ginger Moxey upon her arrival at the Office of the Prime Minister on Friday, September 24, 2021, during her first official day as the new minister.

 

 

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Over 68,000 STAYED HOME in Bahamas Elections; We have BEST and WORST for Voter Participation

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#TheBahamas, September 21, 2021 – The just-concluded General Election in Bahamas has presented a new shift in governance.  The former ruling part, Free National Movement, lost nearly all the electoral seats it secured in the 2017 general elections.  However, this seems a swap of the Progressive Liberal party’s score in the 2017 general elections in which the former ruling party (FNM) won nearly all the parliamentary seats.

68,000 STAYED AWAY

While the FNM secured 35 out of 39 seats in the 2017 ballot, leaving only four slots for the Opposition, the 2021 elections presented “new day” with the Opposition clinching 32 parliamentary seats, leaving the former ruling party FNM with only seven slots.

However, the election results showed a significant drop in voter turnout compared to the 2017 election results. Out of 194,494 registered voters in The Bahamas, only 126,414 voted, translating to 65 per cent voter turnout.

PREVIOUS ELECTION HIGHER

This was different from the previous election in which 160,407 out of 181,543 registered voters cast their ballots, translating to a remarkable 88.36 per cent voter turnout.

Being the first election in the island nation since the Covid-19 struck the Caribbean; the dismal voter turnout could be attributed to the severe impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in The Bahamas and the current countermeasures taken by individuals to avoid contracting the deadly virus.

It could also be voter apathy.

BEST IN SHOW

Despite coronavirus prevalence in the country, North Andros & Berry Islands, Cat Island, Rum Cay & San Salvador, and Mangrove Cay & South Andros constituencies recorded an impressive voter turnout of 77.99 per cent, 76.11 per cent and 73.06 per cent respectively.

North Andros & Berry Islands had 2,126 out of 2,569 registered voters cast their ballots, followed by 1,255 out of 1,622 in Cat Island, Rum Cay & San Salvador, and 1,706 out of 2,164 registered voters in Mangrove Cay & South Andros.

VERY LOW SHOW

The bottom three constituencies in terms of voter turnout include Bamboo Town, which had 3,436 out of 5,838 (58.63 per cent) registered voters cast their ballot, followed by Garden Hills with 3,033 out of 5,287 (57.09 per cent), and   Central & South Abaco falling at the bottom of the list with 1,844 out of 3,271 (55.96 per cent).

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